I stand corrected on a few jokes for Friday

A Mennonite and Amish couple that is related to my sister makes $70 an hour on the Internet in their barn. In their first month, they made $15,000.  Click here for more info.

It is hard to date when you are a Mennonite.  Everyone you meet seems to be a cousin, aunt or uncle, nephew or niece.  I tried to date out of my faith but then my parents were mad that I dated a Catholic.  Maybe there should be a Mennonite dating service on line.  We could call it YoniesMatch.com

Ok, in the short time since this was published, I was corrected!  Apparently there IS A SITE for single Mennonites.  It is called: MennoniteMeet.com.  I was told to stress that it is not Meat, but Meet!  Alrighty then, I was joking but if there are Mennonite singles that desperate to meet ANOTHER Mennonite so be it!   Let’s keep that homogeneous lifestyle going!

love mennonites

A couple jokes for a Friday

A Mennonite and Amish couple that is related to my sister makes $70 an hour on the Internet in their barn. In their first month, they made $15,000.  Click here for more info.

It is hard to date when you are a Mennonite.  Everyone you meet seems to be a cousin, aunt or uncle, nephew or niece.  I tried to date out of my faith but then my parents were mad that I dated a Catholic.  Maybe there should be a Mennonite dating service on line.  We could call it YoniesMatch.com

Ok, in the short time since this was published, I was corrected!  Apparently there IS A SITE for single Mennonites.  It is called: MennoniteMeet.com.  I was told to stress that it is not Meat, but Meet!  Alrighty then, I was joking but if there are Mennonite singles that desperate to meet ANOTHER Mennonite so be it!   Let’s keep that homogeneous lifestyle going!

love mennonites

Wenger Mennonites

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*taken from Wikipedia, Old Order Mennonites

Groffdale Conference (Wenger) Mennonite Church is the largest Old Order Mennonite group to use horse-drawn carriages for transportation.  Their black carriages distinguish them from the Amish, who use gray ones.  They are mainly rural people, using steel-wheeled tractors to work small farms. Along with the automobile, they reject most modern conveniences, while allowing electricity in their homes. Initially concentrated in eastern Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, they resided in eight other states as of 2002.

Belief and practice

The Groffdale Conference arose in 1927 at the conclusion of a seventeen-year disagreement within the Weaverland Old Order Mennonite Conference over use of the automobile. Half of the Weaverland conference, five hundred of the more traditional members, formed this new group in order to retain horse-drawn transportation. The name of the conference comes from the Groffdale churchhouse where Joseph O. Wenger led the first worship services.

Church members use modern self-propelled farm machinery and lawn mowers that have been refitted with steel wheels. Starting in the 1970s, some farmers used rubber belts and blocks to give wheels more traction, provide a smoother ride and reduce damage to public roads. This practice caused considerable debate within the community, which was resolved in 1999 with a compromise that allows limited use of rubber in the structure of steel wheels.  Hard rubber or pneumatic tires are allowed on bicycles and machinery not requiring a driver, such as walk-behind equipment and wagons. Use of steel wheels ensures tractors are not used as a substitute for automobiles to run errands or to make more extensive trips than are convenient with horse-drawn carriages. The steel wheel rule prevents large agricultural operations, reinforcing an emphasis on small farms that provide manual labor for all of the family members.

The German language is used in worship services and Pennsylvania German is spoken at home. They meet in plain church buildings to worship, but do not have Sunday schools. Practicing nonresistance like other traditional Mennonite groups, during World War II they advised young men not qualifying for a farm deferment to accept jail terms instead of Civilian Public Service, the alternate used by other Anabaptist conscientious objectors

Demographics

In 1954 the group consisted of 1,200 members.  As of 2002, the conference has grown to 49 congregations with 8,542 members and a total population of 17,775.  The population has an annual growth rate of 3.7 percent, doubling about every 19 years.  About half live in Pennsylvania, with additional congregations in Iowa, Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, Missouri, New York, Ohio and Wisconsin.

Paraguay Mennonites, because you need more trivia in your life

2009-08-18 ISSUE:

Paraguayan Mennonite facts

by Mennonite World Conference

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•  Mennonite churches have 32,000 members.

•  Total Mennonite population is 60,000, or 1 percent of the nation’s people.

•  Eight Mennonite conferences officially hosted the MWC assembly—three German-speaking, two Spanish-speaking and three composed of the indigenous Enlhet and Nivacle groups.

•  Other Anabaptist groups include Old Colony “horse-and-buggy” Mennonites, Old Order Amish, Beachy Amish and colonies independent of the conferences.

•  Mennonite immigrants came first from Canada in 1927, then from the Soviet Union in 1930, again from Russia in 1947 as displaced survivors of World War II, again from Canada in 1948, and then from Mexico beginning in the 1960s.

•  Mennonites are said to produce 80 percent of the country’s dairy products.

•  Former Paraguayan President Nicanor Duarte Frutos and his wife, Gloria, attend Raices Mennonite Brethren Church in Asunción.

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Christians in the military, part 2

Some interesting comments that came in about Christians and the military.  They were submitted to me (off this site).  I printed them without change but deleted names for their privacy.

My children were raised in a Christian home, and went to Mennonite schools from elementary to high school. When my son was in eleventh grade, 9/11 happened. It was that event that made him decide to enter the military. Do I believe that God called him? Absolutely, as much as he could have been called to be a car salesman, or computer analyst! Has it been hard? You better believe it! Two tours to Afghanistan hasn’t been fun but my faith in God has increased and multiplied as God has shown himself faithful in protecting my son through some dangerous times. And have we prayed together regarding the situations he encountered? Yes! I know my son is a godly example to those men whom he leads, to the elders of tribes in villages where he is a spokesman, and to those who he is accountable to. I thank God for young men and women who serve our country for the freedom we hold dear, but is so often taken for granted.

This article hit close to home. With some of  ******  sisters very conservative Mennonites, we actually got into this very conversation that servicemen can’t be Christian’s. Of course, at the time they had no idea that ***** was pursuing a military career. If they only knew how many times that ****** (not a Christian of course) asked me to pray for his men, their missions, meetings with elders of Afghanistan tribes, etc. they would be amazed! And the freedom that they are offered everyday BECAUSE of men fighting for it is taken for granted and disregarded. This issue makes me HOT!!! But, I know for a fact, that ****** Mennonite Church has had to re-look at their stance because a few of their congregation had enlisted. Interesting, huh? Thanks for your interesting posts!!!

In our small congregation of about 80 folks, we have at least 6 families with a son or son in law in the military. Each name is listed in the bulletin each Sunday for prayer. Updates on each are regularly given. Our son was in first grade when 9/11 occurred and in my mother’s heart knew that he would one day join the military. For him it is the right path in life for now and is part of god’s plan for his life. We are very thankful for the support of our church family.

David was a soldier! There was also this Roman centurion I read about in the Book of Acts; he got saved and filled with Holy Spirit. There was also the centurion whose faith astonished Jesus (Matt. 8). Just something to provoke thought!

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Christians in the military

So we stand on a peace platform.  We are passive.  We don’t go to war.

Where does that leave those who do go to war?  Are they Christians?  Can they be saved?  If you were raised in a Mennonite home, you may have believed that all soldiers, and policeman for that matter, could not be Christians.  It probably wasn’t taught to you that way but that is what you were led to believe.  It was inferred.  Is that too strong a statement?  Did any of you get that idea?  I did.

I was shocked the first time that I went to my wife’s church (a Baptist church – you know they believe in believer’s baptism too) and they had in the bulletin “Serviceman of the week”.  I thought “Serviceman?” why would they be praying for a serviceman?

I found out that yes, there are believers who join the military.  In fact there are a lot of devout believers in the military.  It rocked my world for a short time until I got over it.  We are so busy trying to be inclusive in the Mennonite Church.  How will we react when a soldier comes to church in his or her uniform?

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Some comments from the 2013 conference

Mennonite USA just announced where their 2015 conference will be so those members with horse and buggies will have time to get there.

A Mennonite at the MennoUsa conference in Phoenix was overheard saying “How do they keep these rooms so cold when its so hot outside?” A man answered “That’s air conditioning”. “Is that scriptural?” asked the Mennonite. “I don’t know,” said the other man “but it feels like hell outside so I’m staying inside where its cool!”

“Only Mennonites would pick Phoenix Arizona for a conference in July to save a little bit of money.”

“Why did they have the conference in Arizona?  There aren’t any Mennonites in Arizona.”  “It was cheap.”

Mennonite Proud

Russian Mennonites – some history

The article below is an excerpt from Wikipedia on Russian Mennonites.  My family did not come from this line and I never learned about the history in Russian.  Do any of you speak Plautdietsch?

The Russian Mennonites are a group of Mennonites descended from Dutch and mainly Germanic Prussian Anabaptists who established colonies in South Russian Empire (present-day Ukraine). Since the late 19th century, many of them have come to countries throughout the Western Hemisphere. The rest were forcibly relocated, so that few of their descendants now live at the location of the original colonies. Russian Mennonites are traditionally multilingual with Plautdietsch (Mennonite Low German) as their primary language.

In the early-to-mid 16th century, Mennonites began to move to Russia seeking religious freedom and exemption from military service. They gradually replaced their Dutch with the Plautdietsch dialect spoken in the area, blending into it elements of their native tongues. Plautdietsch is the distinct Mennonite language which developed over a period of 300 years in south Russia.

Catherine the Great of Russia issued a Manifesto in 1763 inviting all Europeans to come and settle various pieces of land within Russia, especially in the Volga River region. For a variety of reasons, Germans responded to this in large numbers.
When the Prussian government eliminated exemption from military service on religious grounds, the remaining Mennonites were eager to emigrate to Russia.

It is interesting to note that this settlement of Mennonites in Russia was at the same time that Mennonites were also moving to America for similar reasons.

Menno history

Mennonite History

I plan to keep this blog light hearted and fun without offending too many people.  I know I can do the first but the second . . . well we’ll see.

I also hope to throw in some tidbits of history and background to the Mennonite faith.  My style of writing is “keeping it short”.  I believe that people these days are too busy to read large documents or they just don’t care that much.  I would rather publish one line than 1,000 pages.

I never read a lot of Mennonite history but I know the basics.  I hope to share these bit by bit in between some funnies to keep it light.  Please let me know if you are interested in this stream.

To get started, here is a really good short article that you might want to read: http://christianity.about.com/od/Mennonites/a/Mennonite-History.htm

I appreciate comments, questions, suggestions on this blog: Two famous Mennonites have already checked in – Steve Shank and Jewel Showalter.  Both are from EMM.  Steve is a fake Mennonite but we’ll overlook that!

 

love mennonites

 

 

What’s the deal with coverings?

My mom wore a covering when I was young but since we were always in liberal churches that practice soon stopped.   I don’t know if the Mennonite Church evolved over time in its understanding of scripture or if it just became so liberal that it didn’t matter anymore.  I never dated a girl with a covering – I was always afraid that they were hiding something like a bald spot or premature gray hair.

The basis for the practice of coverings comes from the scripture:   I Corinthians 11:12-13  For as woman came from man, so also man is born of woman. But everything comes from God.   Judge for yourselves: Is it proper for a woman to pray to God with her head uncovered?

There are many styles of coverings. I am certainly no expert but lets take a look at a few.  Maybe you will find one that you like.

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The is the full head covering with strings.   Women who wear these have a secret desire to ride motorcycles.

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The solid cloth version which is appropriate for colder climates and greasy hair days.

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I’m not familiar with this style.  They are either expandable or for days when an iron is not available.

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The basic doilie.  It is practical since it can be also used on an end table.

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The ghetto cover/hoody model for the urban Mennonites.  I’m not sure if they are accepted by the Bishop but they are used in many cities.

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I’m sorry but I don’t approve of this line.  They are an attempt to wear a covering but be modern and fashionable at the same time.  It doesn’t really work as a head covering and it is not fashionable either.

Finally, This is the basic covering.  It was my mom’s model.  No strings, lace or anything frilly.   If it was a car, it would be a 4 door Chevy.  Very practical and appropriate.

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